Blog Tour: Kindred: 12 Queer Short Stories

June 11, 2019

I didn’t know what to expect when I signed up for this blog tour. These short stories, not only opened my eyes but made me understand and connect with the characters. I’ve been sick in bed for the past week so to spend it reading this book was the only best part.

 

 

 

Kindred combines short stories from twelve different authors into one beautiful book, edited by Michael Earp who also has a story in here. Not only following the story of sexuality but how religion, race, stereotypes, friendships and many more can become a factor too when being queer. 

 

Thank you to AusYaBloggers who gave me the opportunity to take part in this wonderful tour and to Walker Books who provided me with a copy, in no way does the process of how I received this book influence my review. 

 

I enjoyed every story but there were some I preferred over others. Only because I really got into those while the others I just read. Some stories I connected and imagining myself with or alongside that character. 

 

It started off with Rats by Marlee Jane Ward, not what I expected but it drew me in because I wanted to know what’s happening. Toward the end, I got excited because how I saw it, sexuality wasn’t a problem and it rather showed how not to judge anyone, no matter where they came from. That was a good start because it told me, there won’t just be relationships. 

 

In Case of Emergency, Break Glass by Erin Gough was one of my favourites. It shows how you can take a simple catering girl busy with an event (not busy lol!) and not only include v but awareness and feelings. Short and sweet.

 

Bitter Draught by Michael Earp was interesting and I can see it as a novel by itself. I was more concerned about the situation than the two teenage boys! Which I liked because it focused on the sick family member but included their life. Yet it didn’t elude from their goal. 

 

I Like Your Rotation by Jax  was so cute! I couldn’t stop smiling the entire time. It’s rare to see LGBTQIA people with disabilities in books, maybe there are more and I haven’t read that many but I thoroughly enjoyed this. Not only did we have two awesome girls in wheelchairs yet one of them spoke up about the lack of services for LGBTQIA people with disabilities. 

 

I don’t know why this made me sad. Sweet by Claire G. Coleman. A world where gender doesn’t exist and everyone in groups, looking out for each other. A black non-binary protagonist explains their relationship with their crew. Then when they all meet up with Sweet. I don’t want to put in many spoilers but this one is a definite read, and I loved the ending, !

 

Light Bulb by Nevo  another one of my favourites. Ultimate favourite. It goes back and forth from LIGHT to DARK about a non-binary protagonist going through death of one of their parents, being alone and depressed, confused, having one parent along with the dark by their side—all the while growing up. It’s written beautifully, and I expected 

 

Waiting by Jen Wilde was like her other novel, Queens of Geek. Also takes place at a convention, well in a line while waiting to get in. The character with autism finds herself amongst her people by just waiting in a line. I really loved this. That sense of belonging not only because you have something in common with the people around you but their demeanor, how they are as a group and how they respond to things show the person they are. I connected with this one and hopefully one day I find my people too. 

 

Laura Nyro At the Wedding by Christos Tsiolkas was an interesting one. The most it had to do with family and having a supportive partner. It’s present and past. Includes pedophilia where the father slept with his students who was the same age as the main character’s sister. The main character is getting married and wants his dad there. It goes through right and wrong and forgiving, not only with the dad but with the family and partner too. I had my full attention on this one and found it interesting. 

 

I had to wrap my head around this one a few times.  by Ellen van  delt with transphobia in a dystopian world where everyone  and oppressed. I would’ve love to read more of this to dig into the characters and the sacrifices the main one had to make. 

 

An Arab Werewolf in London by Omar Sakr was adorable. I’m a Muslim and I enjoyed reading about a Muslim character having a crush on a family friend and their little encounters. Then, there are always those homophobic lurking around which added some realism into the story. The ending made me smile though. 

 

This was the only one I couldn’t decipher.  by  follows a teenager who gets lost on the other side when an unexpected storm approaches. Trying to get back, the black main character stays with someone and eventually doesn’t leave… it’s hard to explain. 

 

Questions to Ask Straight Relatives by Benjamin Law focused on Chinese families  them having LGBTQIA family members. Though the homophobia and resistant to change are common in other families, in other countries/continents—I liked how this ended the book. It gave me a thing or two to think about. 

 

As you can see, I had many favourites. I tried to keep out any spoilers because it’s a must-read. It didn’t just focus on sexuality and romance but the hardships and challenges people go through or ways everyone goes through stuff differently. For this, I’ll be giving this four stars! All the information is below if you’d like to know more: 

 

Master Post: The AusYABloggers Tour Schedule 

Publisher: Walker Books Australia

Goodreads: Kindred: 12 Queer #LoveOzYA Stories

 

Purchase Links 

 

Angus and RobinsonBooktopiaAmazon AustraliaFishpondThe Book Depository

 

If you purchase the book from The Little Bookroom you can have it signed By Michael Earp. All you have to do is mention in the order notes that you followed the Kindred Tour and would like your copy signed by Michael.

 

If you're looking to find a bookshop near you: Find A Bookshop.

 

 

 

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